molassesinmyveins

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The Punk Singer

molassesinmyveins:

I finally watched the documentary and it was extremely inspiring and motivating. I really enjoyed learning about the more elaborate explanation of bikini kill’s origin, Kathleen Hanna’s background, and the riot grrl movement. 

Yet…

I still felt so disconnected and that really saddens and frustrates me. I want to feel like I could belong in a movement like that, but I don’t. Maybe it’s the music, maybe it’s because I’m black, maybe it’s cause I don’t always want to equate feminism with punk or any kind of underground “scene”. If feminism is for everyone, why do a lot of these radical happenings seem so exclusionary? 

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— 9 hours ago with 7 notes
The Punk Singer

I finally watched the documentary and it was extremely inspiring and motivating. I really enjoyed learning about the more elaborate explanation of bikini kill’s origin, Kathleen Hanna’s background, and the riot grrl movement. 

Yet…

I still felt so disconnected and that really saddens and frustrates me. I want to feel like I could belong in a movement like that, but I don’t. Maybe it’s the music, maybe it’s because I’m black, maybe it’s cause I don’t always want to equate feminism with punk or any kind of underground “scene”. If feminism is for everyone, why do a lot of these radical happenings seem so exclusionary? 

Edit:

This didn’t make sense.

I feel that this documentary (besides sharing Hanna’s deeply personal story with her illness) was meant to encourage girls and women to start their own revolutions, which is great, which is what I definitely felt after watching it, but because I don’t identify with the riot grrl movement in anyway, I’m less likely to carry this active momentum. I love zines and I love writing and reading zines, but even that is often lumped in this punk or hardcore music scene that I’m just not into. I don’t know how to be a part of a “grrl gang” type movement that is both aggressive and forward yet it not be associated with punk music. 

— 9 hours ago with 7 notes
#personal 
felineg00d asked: Do you have any advice for someone transitioning to vegan? I've been vegetarian for about 9 months now and I've already given up milk, I just don't know how to give up cheese


Answer:

youngblackandvegan:

the best way to give up eating cheese is to stop eating cheese

— 3 days ago with 18 notes
#veganism 
Aye Philly, free things are cool. 
Tomorrow, Friday, April 18th. 10pm-2am 
@Teri’s Bar 1126 S. 9th Street
21+

Aye Philly, free things are cool. 

Tomorrow, Friday, April 18th. 10pm-2am

@Teri’s Bar 1126 S. 9th Street

21+

— 6 days ago with 4 notes
#Pussy Division  #Philly  #Philadelphia  #Free 
ATTN: Philly, this is tomorrow! Signal Boost! 
Wednesday, April 16, 20147-9pmAll ages!Free!@The William Way Community Center Ballroom1315 Spruce St
(Moderated by Ethel Cee)Speakers:
Nuala Cabral (Faan Mail)
Elicia Gonzales (Galaei)
Catzie Vilayphonh (Yellow Rage/Laos In the House)
Preeti Pathak (PAVE)
Tarana Burke (Just Be Inc.) 
Event organized in collaboration with Pussy Division.This event is in conjunction with Vox Populi’s current exhibition, Alien She, the first exhibition to examine the lasting impact of Riot Grrrl on artists and cultural producers working today. Alien She has been supported by The Pew Center for Arts & Heritage. More about Alien She exhibition here.


This panel is going to be so dope, and I’m so bummed I won’t make it.

ATTN: Philly, this is tomorrow! Signal Boost! 

Wednesday, April 16, 2014
7-9pm
All ages!
Free!

@The William Way Community Center Ballroom
1315 Spruce St

(Moderated by Ethel Cee)

Speakers:

  • Nuala Cabral (Faan Mail)
  • Elicia Gonzales (Galaei)
  • Catzie Vilayphonh (Yellow Rage/Laos In the House)
  • Preeti Pathak (PAVE)
  • Tarana Burke (Just Be Inc.) 


Event organized in collaboration with Pussy Division.

This event is in conjunction with Vox Populi’s current exhibition, Alien She, the first exhibition to examine the lasting impact of Riot Grrrl on artists and cultural producers working today. Alien She has been supported by The Pew Center for Arts & Heritage. More about Alien She exhibition here.

This panel is going to be so dope, and I’m so bummed I won’t make it.

— 1 week ago with 19 notes
#Pussy Division  #Panal Discussion  #Feminism  #Race  #philadelphia 
endofdayz:

Karyn Washington, founder of the For Brown Girls blog, has died of an apparent suicide, reports MadameNoire.com. The influential blogger was only 22 years old.
Washington’s blog celebrated self-love, particularly among dark-skinned women. She also launched the #DarkSkinRedLip project after rapper A$AP Rocky suggested that darker-skinned women should avoid crimson lips. Following her lead, thousands of women of color posted photos of themselves proudly rocking red lips using the hashtag.
While working earnestly to empower women of all races and colors, Washington was also dealing with personal struggles. According to a friend, she had been battling depression and was also finding it hard to deal with the loss of her mother.
http://www.bet.com/news/fashion-and-beauty/2014/04/11/for-brown-girls-blog-creator-dies-of-apparent-suicide.html
Black women, who often shoulder so much burden and to admit any weakness of the mind and body is to be considered defective. Vulnerability is not allowed. Tears are discouraged. Victims are incessantly blamed. We are hard on our women, and suffer as a result.
When your community tells you that you’re better off praying than seeking the advice of medical professionals and medication, you feel shame when you feel your mind is breaking. There is no safe place. To admit to any mental frailty is to invite scorn and mockery.
Mental Illness is Real
R.I.P.

endofdayz:

Karyn Washington, founder of the For Brown Girls blog, has died of an apparent suicide, reports MadameNoire.com. The influential blogger was only 22 years old.

Washington’s blog celebrated self-love, particularly among dark-skinned women. She also launched the #DarkSkinRedLip project after rapper A$AP Rocky suggested that darker-skinned women should avoid crimson lips. Following her lead, thousands of women of color posted photos of themselves proudly rocking red lips using the hashtag.

While working earnestly to empower women of all races and colors, Washington was also dealing with personal struggles. According to a friend, she had been battling depression and was also finding it hard to deal with the loss of her mother.

http://www.bet.com/news/fashion-and-beauty/2014/04/11/for-brown-girls-blog-creator-dies-of-apparent-suicide.html

Black women, who often shoulder so much burden and to admit any weakness of the mind and body is to be considered defective. Vulnerability is not allowed. Tears are discouraged. Victims are incessantly blamed. We are hard on our women, and suffer as a result.

When your community tells you that you’re better off praying than seeking the advice of medical professionals and medication, you feel shame when you feel your mind is breaking. There is no safe place. To admit to any mental frailty is to invite scorn and mockery.

Mental Illness is Real

R.I.P.

(via colourdgirlswithink)

— 1 week ago with 5232 notes
#tw death  #tw suicide 
molassesinmyveins:

ATTN PHILLY! SIGNAL BOOST! 
How dope is this?!
"This comprehensive course will be instructed by Sempai Elena Waldman and will teach participants the 5 areas of self-defense: think, voice, fight, run and self-care. This will be a 5 hour course including a short break for lunch; 10am-3pm (registration at 9:30). Please bring lunch as there will not be time to go out to eat.”ALL GENDERS WELCOME!Saturday, April 12th10am-3PM$5-10, sliding scaleBring brown bag lunchAges 16+First Unitarian ChurchGriffin Hall2125 Chestnut St.Buy Tickets here! Event organized in collaboration with Pussy Division.This event is in conjunction with Vox Populi’s current exhibition Alien She, the first exhibition to examine the lasting impact of Riot Grrrl on artists and cultural producers working today. Alien She has been supported by The Pew Center for Arts & Heritage.http://voxpopuligallery.org/exhibitions/alien-she/

This is tomorrow! Boost!

molassesinmyveins:

ATTN PHILLY! SIGNAL BOOST! 

How dope is this?!

"This comprehensive course will be instructed by Sempai Elena Waldman and will teach participants the 5 areas of self-defense: think, voice, fight, run and self-care. This will be a 5 hour course including a short break for lunch; 10am-3pm (registration at 9:30). Please bring lunch as there will not be time to go out to eat.”


ALL GENDERS WELCOME!
Saturday, April 12th
10am-3PM
$5-10, sliding scale
Bring brown bag lunch
Ages 16+

First Unitarian Church
Griffin Hall
2125 Chestnut St.

Buy Tickets here! 

Event organized in collaboration with Pussy Division.

This event is in conjunction with Vox Populi’s current exhibition Alien She, the first exhibition to examine the lasting impact of Riot Grrrl on artists and cultural producers working today. Alien She has been supported by The Pew Center for Arts & Heritage.

http://voxpopuligallery.org/exhibitions/alien-she/

This is tomorrow! Boost!

— 1 week ago with 35 notes
#street harassment  #self defense  #philadelphia  #philly 
marinashutup:

socimages:

U.S. Army releases racially biased hairstyle regulations.
Sgt. Jasmine Jacobs of the National Guard in Georgia has always plaited her hair into two twists around her head. She has been in the military for six years and has worn her hair natural (meaning no chemical treatments [perms] or hair extensions [weaves]) for four of those years. But according to the new hair-grooming requirements the U.S. Army recently released, her hair is now out of regulation.
And so are the Afro-centric hairstyles of many black women in the Army, who make up 31 percent of Army women.
Jacobs, who said she is “kind of at a loss now with what to do with my hair,” has started a White House petition asking the Army to rethink its new hair guidelines. The petition has collected more than 7,000 signatures from soldiers and civilians, but needs to reach 100,000 signatures by April 19th in order for the White House to address it.
The petition states:

Females with natural hair take strides to style their natural hair in a professional manner when necessary; however, changes to AR 670-1 offer little to no options for females with natural hair… These new changes are racially biased and the lack of regard for ethnic hair is apparent.

The new Army Regulation 670-1  was published Tuesday and illustrates with photos the types of hairstyles that are unauthorized for women. Those include dreadlocks, twists or any type of matted or coiled hair. A particularly cumbersome requirement disallows the bulk of a woman’s hair to “exceed more than 2″ from her scalp.” That rules out Afros and most types of non-chemically altered black hair.
Basically, almost every natural hair option that black women in the Army could wear is now off limits. One of the few traditionally natural hairstyles that was listed as appropriate is cornrows, but a slew of specifications and rules surrounded even that. The diameter of each cornrow can’t be more than one-fourth of an inch, and no more than one-eighth of an inch of scalp may be shown between cornrows.
The only way to realistically meet the new standards would be to shave one’s head, perm one’s hair or wear weaves or wigs.
Jacobs said twists like the one she wears are very popular among black women soldiers because the style requires little maintenance when in the field. Her hair’s thickness and curliness makes pulling her hair back into a bun (a style popular among white women soldiers) impossible.
A spokesperson for the Army said the grooming changes are “necessary to maintain uniformity within a military population.” When that need for “uniformity” erases the ethnic differences of a group of women and forces them to constrain themselves to European standards of hair, it presents a serious problem.
“I think, at the end of the day, a lot of people don’t understand the complexities of natural hair… I’m disappointed to see the Army, rather than inform themselves on how black people wear their hair, they’ve white-washed it all,” said Jacobs.
Screenshots taken from Army Regulation 670-1.
Anita Little is the associate editor at Ms. magazine, where this post originally appeared. You can follow her on Twitter.

Holy shit.

This is the military for you! If you read the actual regulations, which is long and tedious, (but with fun photos!)you’ll see there’s a ton of “unauthorized” hairstyles for women, like your damn side part isn’t straight or your scrunchie doesn’t match your haircolor, however, the rules for locs and braids are clearly the most ridiculous and definitely racially implied.
I don’t care for the military, but I care for black women’s right to wear their hair as they choose, so here’s the petition you can sign. It ends April 19th, so signal boost this. 

marinashutup:

socimages:

U.S. Army releases racially biased hairstyle regulations.

Sgt. Jasmine Jacobs of the National Guard in Georgia has always plaited her hair into two twists around her head. She has been in the military for six years and has worn her hair natural (meaning no chemical treatments [perms] or hair extensions [weaves]) for four of those years. But according to the new hair-grooming requirements the U.S. Army recently released, her hair is now out of regulation.

And so are the Afro-centric hairstyles of many black women in the Army, who make up 31 percent of Army women.

Jacobs, who said she is “kind of at a loss now with what to do with my hair,” has started a White House petition asking the Army to rethink its new hair guidelines. The petition has collected more than 7,000 signatures from soldiers and civilians, but needs to reach 100,000 signatures by April 19th in order for the White House to address it.

The petition states:

Females with natural hair take strides to style their natural hair in a professional manner when necessary; however, changes to AR 670-1 offer little to no options for females with natural hair… These new changes are racially biased and the lack of regard for ethnic hair is apparent.

The new Army Regulation 670-1  was published Tuesday and illustrates with photos the types of hairstyles that are unauthorized for women. Those include dreadlocks, twists or any type of matted or coiled hair. A particularly cumbersome requirement disallows the bulk of a woman’s hair to “exceed more than 2″ from her scalp.” That rules out Afros and most types of non-chemically altered black hair.

Basically, almost every natural hair option that black women in the Army could wear is now off limits. One of the few traditionally natural hairstyles that was listed as appropriate is cornrows, but a slew of specifications and rules surrounded even that. The diameter of each cornrow can’t be more than one-fourth of an inch, and no more than one-eighth of an inch of scalp may be shown between cornrows.

The only way to realistically meet the new standards would be to shave one’s head, perm one’s hair or wear weaves or wigs.

Jacobs said twists like the one she wears are very popular among black women soldiers because the style requires little maintenance when in the field. Her hair’s thickness and curliness makes pulling her hair back into a bun (a style popular among white women soldiers) impossible.

A spokesperson for the Army said the grooming changes are “necessary to maintain uniformity within a military population.” When that need for “uniformity” erases the ethnic differences of a group of women and forces them to constrain themselves to European standards of hair, it presents a serious problem.

“I think, at the end of the day, a lot of people don’t understand the complexities of natural hair… I’m disappointed to see the Army, rather than inform themselves on how black people wear their hair, they’ve white-washed it all,” said Jacobs.

Screenshots taken from Army Regulation 670-1.

Anita Little is the associate editor at Ms. magazine, where this post originally appeared. You can follow her on Twitter.

Holy shit.

This is the military for you! If you read the actual regulations, which is long and tedious, (but with fun photos!)you’ll see there’s a ton of “unauthorized” hairstyles for women, like your damn side part isn’t straight or your scrunchie doesn’t match your haircolor, however, the rules for locs and braids are clearly the most ridiculous and definitely racially implied.

I don’t care for the military, but I care for black women’s right to wear their hair as they choose, so here’s the petition you can sign. It ends April 19th, so signal boost this. 

(via to-her-darkness)

— 2 weeks ago with 4451 notes
#US ARMY 
Patriarchy, Sexism and Misogynoir - An Intraracial View

gradientlair:

I recognize the amazing work that many Black men who are intersectional feminists engage in and like bell hooks mentioned, I speak about that good work and don’t pretend that there are no Black men interested in such work.

However, I am NOT going to be silent on the impact of intraracial sexism, misogynoir and patriarchal thinking by Black men and its impact on my own life, Black women or the Black community. I have never been silent on this. Further, I am always interested in discussing it within the larger context of White supremacist capitalist patriarchy and kyriarchy itself because I don’t believe in arbitrary, de-contextualized blaming, as that is not analysis or Womanist work.

Like bell hooks wrote:

Everyone seems eager to forget that it is possible for Black women to love Black men and yet unequivocally challenge and oppose sexism, male domination and phallocentrism.

Below are some of my essays that I’ve written on this topic, some highly personal and others examine my experiences and Black women’s in a larger context.

Related Essay List: On Race…

— 2 weeks ago with 367 notes
#reblogging for future reference  #womanism  #intraracial 
Any Philly folk going to this tomorrow? I would love to go with a buddy :c

Any Philly folk going to this tomorrow? I would love to go with a buddy :c

— 2 weeks ago with 4 notes
#hollabackphilly  #anti-street harassment  #love park  #philadelphia  #street harassment  #FAAN mail  #philly  #activism